Auto Transport States


Alabama has had five capitals since it became part of the United States. During the territorial period, the town of St. Stephens (in what is now Washington County) served as the capital of the Alabama Territory, beginning in 1817. When Alabama achieved statehood in 1819, the capital shifted to Huntsville for the first state constitutional convention, and the next year, after much lobbying by political factions, the capital was moved to Cahawba, Dallas County. As the power centers in the state began to shift, political factions began to push for a new site, and in 1826, the state legislature voted to move the capital Tuscaloosa, where it remained until 1846, when the centrally located Montgomery was selected as the permanent state capital.

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Phoenix, the largest city in the state, is the capital. Tucson is the state's second largest city, located 110 miles (180 km) southeast of the Phoenix metropolitan area. The Tucson metropolitan area crossed the one-million-resident threshold in early 2007. It is home to the University of Arizona. Yuma, center of the third largest metropolitan area in Arizona, is located near the borders of California and Mexico. It is one of the hottest cities in the United States with the average July high of 107 degrees Fahrenheit. The city also features sunny days about 90 percent of the year and attracts many winter visitors from all over the United States. Flagstaff is the largest city in northern Arizona, and at nearly 7000 ft elevation, is a stark contrast to the desert regions typically associated with Arizona. Flagstaff is home to 57,391 residents and the main campus of Northern Arizona University.

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Little Rock, the major port on the Arkansas River, lies among the easternmost foothills of the Ouachita Mountains. A marketing centre and the site of assorted manufacturing facilities, the city also is home to various corporate headquarters and convention centres, as well as an array of renovated historic buildings. At the western boundary of the state lies Fort Smith. It is one of the most industrialized cities in the state and serves as a regional business and service centre. The economy of Pine Bluff, some 50 miles (80 km) downriver from Little Rock, continues to depend largely on the surrounding agricultural area, but since the late 20th century it also has become more industrialized and business-oriented. Texarkana, contiguous with the Texas city with the same name, is an important regional rail centre. An urban concentration in northwest Arkansas has emerged in the wake of the rapid growth of retailing in Bentonville, of trucking in Lowell, and of poultry interests in Springdale and other cities of the region.

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The capital is Sacramento. The fluid nature of the state’s social, economic, and political life—shaped so largely by the influx of people from other states and countries—has for centuries made California a laboratory for testing new modes of living. California’s population, concentrated mostly along the coast, is the most urban in the United States, with more than three-fourths of the state’s people living in the Los Angeles, San Francisco, and San Diego metropolitan areas. Despite its urbanization and the loss of land to industry, California still leads the country in agricultural production. About one-half of the state’s land is federally owned. National parks located throughout the state are devoted to the preservation of nature and natural resources.

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The capital is Denver. Ready availability of water, a climate conducive to outdoor work and recreation, and proximity to the mountain front were mainly responsible for the large population growth of the Colorado Piedmont in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Those 22 counties occupy one-third of the state’s land area, and the overwhelming majority of the state’s people live in the metropolitan areas of Denver-Aurora-Lakewood, Boulder, Colorado Springs, Pueblo, Fort Collins, Greeley, and Grand Junction.

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The state has no single large city, however, and the intense crowding characteristic of many urban areas is not found in Connecticut. It continues its long tradition of prosperity, with in-migrants attracted by the good employment opportunities, excellent educational facilities, and pleasant living conditions for the majority of its people. However, Connecticut also displays sharp contrasts between areas of great wealth and great privation. The city centres of Hartford, New Haven, and Bridgeport are particularly poverty-ridden. In this sense there are “two” Connecticuts.

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Most state government operations are located in Dover, the capital. Several high bridges over the canal, the giant twin bridges crossing the Delaware River north of New Castle, and the refinery stacks at Delaware City are the major landmarks on the horizon below the northwestern corner of the state, where the rolling hills of the Piedmont extend south from Pennsylvania. Until the mid-20th century, farmlands, woodlands, streams, and ponds, interspersed by occasional villages, made up most of the state’s landscape to the south of Wilmington. Suburban housing has spread out to encompass the area on either side of the canal and has encroached on New Castle county’s remaining farmland.

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The capital is Tallahassee, located in the northwestern panhandle. he great majority of the population lives in urban areas, and only a tiny percentage lives on farms. The densest concentration is along the extensive Miami–Fort Lauderdale–Boca Raton–West Palm Beach urban complex in the southeast. This area appears to many observers to be duplicating the less desirable aspects of the great urban belts burgeoning in other parts of the country. On the west coast the Tampa–St. Petersburg metropolitan area contains another concentration of population. Farther north the Daytona Beach–Cape Canaveral–Orlando triangle is central Florida’s dominant urban area, Jacksonville is the major hub of the upper east coast and southeastern Georgia, and Pensacola dominates the western panhandle and part of southern Alabama. Lesser metropolitan areas—including Tallahassee, Gainesville, and Fort Myers—are hubs of local influence.

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The capital is Atlanta. Railroads replaced water transport in the late 1800s and early 1900s, but more recently navigation on 500 miles (800 km) of inland waterways was revived, and a state port authority created barge service at Augusta, Columbus, Bainbridge, Savannah, and Brunswick for the distribution of chemical, wood, and mineral products. Savannah is one of the leading ports on the southern Atlantic coast, in terms of tonnage of cargo handled, and has one of the country’s major container facilities.

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Boise is the state capital. Many factors—religion, agriculture, transportation, topography, industry, cultural ties, and sectional pride—have contributed to Idaho’s diverse regional characteristics. For many years writers and politicians consistently referred to the division of Idaho into two regions: northern Idaho, meaning the 10 northern counties, and southern Idaho, the rest of the state. A more accurate view of regionalism in the state, however, takes into account the trading and marketing centres, resulting in regions that sometimes cross state boundaries. According to this view, the regions are Lewiston and Spokane, Wash., in the north; Boise, Twin Falls, Pocatello, and Idaho Falls in the south; and the Logan–Ogden–Salt Lake City axis in northern Utah, which extends into the Bear Lake Valley of southeastern Idaho. More than half of the state’s population lives in urban areas; the largest concentration is in the southwest, in Boise and nearby Nampa and Meridian. Other urbanized areas are Idaho Falls and Pocatello, in the southeast, and Coeur d’Alene, in the northwest.

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The capital is Springfield, in the west-central part of the state. side from the aforementioned distinction between the Chicago area and downstate derived from population patterns, Illinois can be separated into three broad regions that differ markedly in their economic and social characteristics. A highly urbanized band—with extensive farming areas in between—reaches across the state in the north from Chicago to the Rock Island–Moline complex on the Mississippi and includes Kankakee, Joliet, and Rockford. Most farmland is located within easy reach of urban centres. The region is characterized by heavy industry around Chicago and the other centres, with a large and rapidly expanding suburban complex of shopping facilities, single-family dwellings, and apartment houses. The central third of the state includes the cities of Springfield, Bloomington and Normal, Peoria, Champaign and Urbana, Danville, Galesburg, Quincy, and Decatur.

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Its capital has been at Indianapolis since 1825. The northeastern part of the state is more forested and pastoral, although Elkhart and Fort Wayne are major industrial centres. The fertile plains of the central agricultural zone form the second occupational region of Indiana. Indianapolis, a city designed after Versailles, France, and Washington, D.C., dominates the area; The region’s major city, Evansville, continues to serve adjacent areas of Kentucky and Illinois, and between it and Terre Haute to the north lie most of the state’s oil and coal deposits. Southward from Bloomington is a vast limestone belt underlain by numerous caves, which makes the state a major limestone producer.

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